Labyrinths: Emma Jung

There have been plenty of biographies of Carl Jung and plenty as well of other leading figures in the history of psychotherapy. I will be reviewing a number of them later, but because “Labyrinths: Emma Jung, Her Marriage to Carl, and the Early Years of Psychoanalysis” (2016) by Catrine Clay is the first biography of Emma Jung and her role in Carl’s life and the psychoanalytic movement, I feel it is fitting to feature her now. During this time in 2018 when we are gradually recognizing and giving credit to women who have contributed so much in many different fields, Emma Jung, as the wife of Carl has rarely been mentioned in literature about the psychoanalytic movement. Emma. She was a wealthy heiress and fell in love with Carl when she was just seventeen. Her wealth enabled him to accomplish a number of things he would otherwise not have done. But it was her steadfastness, tolerance and intelligence which withstood his various affairs and long time quasi marriage to Toni Wolff, that helped Carl succeed. She supported him and her children, and acted as Carl’s thinking partner during the early years of his relationship with Freud. She traveled with Carl for some of his trips to Vienna to work with Freud and she had a series of personal letter exchanges with Freud herself. She stood by Carl when he finally broke with Freud. She eventually embraced his relationship with Toni Wolff. She became an analyst herself in her forties and one of her first analysands was Barbara Hannah, who was Carl’s first biographers. Emma’s approach as an analyst was different from most others: one analysand said, “She approached the problem you brought to her quietly, even tentatively, but there was no fumbling. To be “right” did not appear to interest her. She met you where you were at”.

I have read quite a number of works about the various figures in the psychoanalytic movement and the social/political rifts which were part of the early years. Reading about Emma’s role in helping Carl and herself in shaping the movement, regardless of the split with Freud, is essential in contextualizing what we already know. It really wasn’t all Carl.